Online Biz

Posts Tagged ‘windows

How-to-get-Macs-and-PCs-to-play-nice-together

Macs and PCs may work differently, but they can coexist together. Learn how to comfortably straddle the gap between both operating systems with these simple tips.

Microsoft and Apple have always been competitors on some level, and as a result, their fans often contain a bit of that old competitive spirit. It’s not uncommon for Mac buyers to become overnight loyalists, but Windows has an entrenched fanboy battalion as well.

Given the situation, it’s almost unnatural to think that – *gasp* – someone might own both a Windows PC and a Mac. Can you imagine the nerve? In the same household! Yet it does occur. In fact, I myself own a Windows PC as well as a MacBook, and so far one hasn’t killed the other (or me) while I slept.

With that said, getting the two to play nice can take some time. File, software, and hardware compatibility issues are not as bad as they were a decade ago, but they do exist. Fortunately, there are ways to overcome them.

Conquering old-fashioned file compatibility problems

There was once a time when trying to move a file between a PC and a Mac was a real hassle. Software on each end was wildly different, so files saved on a Mac often could not be opened in Windows without some form of conversion. Error-Cartoon

Today, this problem has lessened. However, the two operating systems continue to use different file systems. Windows relies on NTFS, while OS X uses HFS Plus.

This has no impact on actual file compatibility. A Word document written on a Mac using HFS Plus can be opened on an NTFS file system Windows PC. The problem is the method of file transfer. Macs can read files on an NTFS drive, but can’t write to an NTFS drive, while Windows can neither read nor write to HFS Plus drives. If you normally use physical media to transfer files, this could be a stumbling block.

What’s the solution? Get FAT…32. This file system, which was used by Windows back in the Windows 95/98 era, is read/write compatible with both Windows and Mac OS X. Thumb drives and external hard drives formatted with FAT32 will be compatible with both systems. Problem solved right?

Software compatibility continues to disappoint

Software is still a compatibility sticking point between Macs and PCs. It is still up to a developer to code for either operating system.

Microsoft’s debut of Office for the Mac was the only major software compatibility change to recently take place (and even this occurred years ago), but it was important. Basic productivity tasks are now much easier to complete if you own both platforms because you’ll have a set of familiar and compatible programs available on both.

Windows-7-and-Mac-OS

However, it’s almost universally true that you must purchase the Windows and Mac versions individually, which can be a pain to your pocketbook. One notable exception is Steam for Mac. This gaming platform provides gamers with both a Windows and Mac copy of a video game (if the Mac version is available) when they purchase a title.

Syncing files between systems

File sync software is a blessing if you own multiple computers, but for those who own both PCs and Macs, software compatibility issues are a roadblock. Sync software often only supports one platform or the other.

Surprisingly, one of the easier solutions comes from Microsoft. The company offers a program called Windows Live Mesh that can be used to sync files between systems, and it has both a PC and Mac version. I’ve personally used this and found it works well – and it’s completely free, no matter how much data you need to sync.

Another option is, well, any service that’s based in the cloud. Dropbox is the most common example, but there are tons of similar offerings. However, you usually need to pay once your storage needs go beyond a certain point because the files are stored in the cloud, not on your computers.

bill gates

All you aspiring 1-percenters, take heed: Bill Gates says that, after you become a millionaire, it doesn’t really make much of a difference how much more money you make.

 

It’s one thing to be told that money isn’t everything by someone who has never had any. It’s quite another when the person giving the advice is the wealthiest man in the world.

This lesson was recently learned by a lucky group of computer science and engineering students at the University of Washington, who had the opportunity to listen of Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, a native of UW’s hometown of Seattle, give his two cents about life, technology and getting rich.

“I didn’t start out with the dream of being super-rich,” said Gates. “And even after we started Microsoft, and the guys who ran Intel—Gordon Moore and those guys—were billionaires, I was like, ‘Wow, that must be strange.’ And so—it is, it’s quite strange.”

He added: “But wealth above a certain level, really, it’s a responsibility that then you’re going have to either, a.) leave it to your children, which may or may not be good for them, or b.) try to be smart about giving it away.

“So I can understand wanting to have millions of dollars, because there’s meaningful freedom that comes with that. But once you get much beyond that—you know, I have to tell you, it’s the same hamburgerDick’s [a local fast food chain] has not raised their prices enough. But, you know, being ambitious is good. You just have to pick what you enjoy doing.”[Emphasis ours]

Gates also said that he believes ” that the rich should be taxed a lot more,” but that the best thing America can do for those with thinner wallets is to provide a quality education that can “give them an opportunity to move up into the top few percent.”

Read a full report about Gates’ talk here.

 

Provided by Andrew Couts

microsoft-office-future-video

Microsoft has released a concept video showing its vision of the future. Spoiler alert: cell phones are going to get thinner.

 

Want to watch another concept video of what the future might be like? You’ve come to the right place. Two days ago, Microsoft’s Office YouTube channel released a video showing what productivity might be like in the future. Oddly, there aren’t many Office or Microsoft logos around and the interfaces of most devices don’t really look like Windows, though they all seem to use the Windows Phone fonts and simplistic style.

In Microsoft’s vision, all screens are as thin as a sheet of paper, cell phones are just a slice of glass, everything has holographic displays, you can flick documents from one object to another, and even desks and car windows have built in screens. The question is, do we want to live in a world like this? It seems a bit sterile.

Provided by Jeffrey Van Camp